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Archive for September, 2011

 

The 2nd Annual Santa Barbara SOL Food Festival is tomorrow, Saturday, October 2nd from 10am-6pm. Click on the guide above to see the full schedule of events. There are 3 stages with something for everyone. Be Food Smart will be doing SOL Food Jeopardy games all day. We have fun prizes including reusable produce bags, Stonyfield rubber spatulas, organic cotton Yo-Baby bibs, Zhena’s Gypsy tea samples, coupons for free Stonyfield products, and coupons for deals at Whole Foods and Isla Vista Co-Op.

Be Food Smart will be at booth #79 near the beer & wine garden.

Stop by our booth and say hi!

 

 

 

This is a guest post by Traver H. Boehm. Be Food Smart showcases voices from all fronts of the food movement. Know of a blogger, farmer or passionate food writer who may be interested? Contact us or provide details in your comment.

 

This is Part 3 of a three-part series on The Paleo Diet. Click here for Part 1 and Part 2.

So how do we balance the strict boundaries of Paleolithic eating with living in the modern world? Today, “Paleo’ish” is how Eric, Ali (my fiancé and co-acupuncture/nutrition partner in crime at Alki Wellness) and I eat and how we recommend that all of our clients and patients eat as well. After a few more rounds with the above story, we’ve all come to the conclusion that the 80/20 rule is our Paleolithic nutritional savior. Going from one extreme to the other is a common experience for people who set themselves up to eat 100% Paleo 100% of the time. It just isn’t sustainable if you want to have a social life and allow yourself to enjoy some of the finer points of the human experience.
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This is a guest post by Traver H. Boehm. Be Food Smart showcases voices from all fronts of the food movement. Know of a blogger, farmer or passionate food writer who may be interested? Contact us or provide details in your comment.

 

This is Part 2 of a three-part series on The Paleo Diet. Click here to read Part 1.

Day 1 of our 30-day Paleo challenge is about to begin…and we have no idea what we’re in store for. What did this mean though, what were we actually allowed to and not allowed to consume? Here’s what we could eat: lean meat, fish, chicken, nuts and seeds (except cashews), vegetables (except legumes), and fruit. We could season our food with spices and that was it.
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The Paleo Diet: So Easy a Caveman Could Do It (Part 1 of 3)

This is a guest post by Traver H. Boehm. Be Food Smart showcases voices from all fronts of the food movement. Know of a blogger, farmer or passionate food writer who may be interested? Contact us or provide details in your comment.

Banksy's Caveman

Photo by Stefan Kloo

This is Part 1 of a Three-Part Series on The Paleo Diet.

By September 9, 2011, the words “Paleo Diet” or “Caveman Diet” have entered into the public lexicon to some degree.  Everyone has a cousin who knows someone who’s tried the diet and has developed an opinion from there.

I remember back to the very first nutrition seminar that I ever listened to as a CrossFitter.  A stunning woman named Nicole Carrol came into my gym in Santa Monica and proceeded to tell us that just about everything that I enjoyed in life – white rice, wine, Ben & Jerry’s (I almost walked out), chips with or without salsa, and on and on, was now off limits.
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After doing a presentation for the Santa Barbara Girl Scouts, a troop leader came up to me with the empty box from a Lunchables package. She said she thought that given my presentation, I should see what was actually in this product. Notice how I used the word “product” instead of “food.” These are not interchangeable.  My goal with this post is not to make any parent feel bad about feeding their child Lunchables, but rather to open your eyes to what is actually in this item.

I started my research with on the Kraft Lunchables website. When I clicked on the picture of the Bologna + American Cracker Stacker with Juice, this is what it says:

Give them the good stuff. Made with Oscar Mayer bologna made with chicken and pork, Kraft American and Ritz Crackers. Includes Capri Sun Roarin’ Waters.

Nutritional Highlights

  • Excellent Source of Protein, Calcium
  • Crackers made with 5g Whole Grain per serving

Wow, protein, calcium and whole grains? This must be the “good stuff!” Or maybe not…
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Dairy, dairy quite contrary

How does your bacteria grow?

With metal grates and heated plates,

And filthy cows all in a row.

 

Ever wonder how your milk gets from the cow to your bowl of cereal? Grist.org just did a great story on dairy. Essentially, milk goes through a 3-step process of pasteurization, homogenization and fortification. Here is a list of must-know terms from today’s milk production.

Pasteurization

Pasteurization is the process of using heat to destroy microorganisms in foods. Do you know the difference between pasteurized, ultra-pasteurized, and raw?  Here are the 4 main ways dairy is pasteurized:

High Temperature Short Time (HTST)
This is the most common method of pasteurization in the U.S. HTST uses metal plates and hot water to raise milk temperatures to at least 161F/72C degrees for a minimum of 15 seconds, followed by rapid cooling.

Ultra Pasteurized (UP)
Milk or milk product is heated to 280F/138 C degrees for two seconds. UP results in a product with longer shelf life, but still requires refrigeration. Most organic milk is ultra pasteurized to extend the shelf life.
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Seeing Michael Pollan speak was on my list of things to do. When it was announced he was coming to Santa Barbara, I marked it on my calendar. But somehow, I got busy. Let’s see, there was a birthday party to plan and a book club dinner to prepare for. By the time I looked up, it was Thursday evening and the event was sold out.  If you know me well, you may have heard this sentence come out of my mouth, “things just tend to work out.” Thursday was a prime example of my life philosophy. I decided to take a chance and go down the Granada Theater early to see if anyone was selling a ticket. The end result? I got a FREE orchestra ticket from the director at my daughter’s school after they had a last minute cancellation.  The bonus? The parking attendant was no longer at the kiosk, so I got free parking too.

The event was billed, An Evening with Michael Pollan in Conversation with Renee Montagne.  The newly remodeled Granada stage featured two oversized, tan leather chairs and a coffee table filled with a mound of whole fruits and vegetables (although from my vantage point, they looked fake). Michael walked onstage with Renee, he in an slim-profile olive suit, her in a black dress ensemble. Renee announced that this would be a casual event; she would ask questions first and then there would be an audience Q&A at the end. The theater has a strict policy against the use of cell phones during any show, so I was forced to take notes on my program in the dark. I did my best to get exact quotes, but some may be slightly off (since I couldn’t read all my own handwriting).
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