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Archive for February, 2012

It’s no secret that our food supply is in dire straights. In support of Occupy Our Food Supply Day, here are some important links to read and share. If you are on Twitter, use hashtag #F27 to add your voice to the conversation.

Occupy Our Food Supply website
Rainforest Action Network

Dr. Vandana Shiva: Occupy our food supply!
Grist
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In 2008, which was a year of supposed food crisis, we grew enough food to feed 11 billion people.

- Michael Pollan

It took Marija Jacimovic and Benoit Detalle, 3 weeks to whip up this 2-minute, stop-motion video based on Michael Pollan’s iconic Food Rules. These two artists entered a competition put on by the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts Short Film Competition and are one of the 5 finalists. We love the creative use of food and have already voted for the video!

Watch and vote today by clicking on this link: Film Competition. The winner will be posted on March 12th.

“Food Rules” by Michael Pollan – RSA/Nominet Trust competition from Marija Jacimovic on Vimeo.


Arsenic. When I hear that word I immediately think of a TV mystery where someone’s lover is poisoned to death via the toxin. Today, arsenic is not the star in some made-for-tv drama but rather a news-maker for a completely different reason. Arsenic is in our food and you could be eating it every day. Have you read the recent reports of elevated arsenic levels in apple juice? Just weeks later, and now, it’s showing up in many organic food products.

Environmental chemist, Brian P. Jackson, and his team at Dartmouth, discovered that organic foods containing the popular alternative sweetener, brown rice syrup, tested high for arsenic. Among the foods tested were infant formula, cereal bars, energy bars, and energy “shots.”
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When I saw the advertisement for Jack in the Box’s Bacon Shake, I had to know what was really inside. Do they actually blend up bacon and ice cream?  As with the 21 ingredients in McDonald’s Fruit & Maple Oatmeal, I’m finding a trend with fast food menus. They give you a simple description of what’s in the product, but don’t actually tell you the ingredient list without some serious digging. Case in point. When you look up the Bacon Shake, here is what you see:

Bacon Shake
Made with real vanilla ice cream, bacon flavored syrup, whipped topping and a maraschino cherry.

While the descriptions sounds fairly simple and straight forward, there are some early warning signs. First, is the “bacon flavored” bit. If it really contained bacon, it would tell you so. Second is the “whipped topping.”  This is not to be confused with whipped cream as they are entirely two different things. Third, we’re all aware that no cherry is that candy-red in nature, so be assured you’re about to consume some red dye.

Here is the full ingredient list for the Jack in the Box Bacon Shake…all 48 of them:
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So what’s the big deal if the majority of our food contains soy? Well, if you’re like Kathy Kottaras’ daughter M, it may mean yet another ear infection and up to six months of antibiotics. Why? Both M and her dad, Matthew Frey, have soy allergies.

Matthew and M struggled with constant illness. For Matthew it was digestive problems and for M it was sinus infections, ear aches and congestion. Matthew’s visits to the doctor always led to more antibiotics and it was only after an elimination diet that he finally figured out he was allergic to soy. I chatted with Kathy Kottaras of Subtract Soy Now to understand what’s going on with soy in our foods, why it’s problematic, and why she’s fighting to get soy out of America’s most popular cookies.
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Are you hosting a Superbowl party? Need a kick-ass recipe to impress your guests?

Try this food-allergy friendly recipe for Slow-Cooked BBQ Chicken Thighs.

Last week we interviewed Kathy Kottaras of Subtract Soy Now (article coming tomorrow) and she shared this recipe with us. Not only is it a fabulous recipe, it’s also free from common allergens making it an excellent entree for friends with food sensitivities. Kathy explains how she came up with the recipe:

Why soy-free? Because my husband and daughter are both allergic to soy (it’s a top eight allergen), and because most BBQ recipes call for Worcestershire, which contains soy, AND most bottled sauces contain soy. I had to figure out something. The chipotle adds the smoke flavor but leaves out the soy. And family can eat BBQ again! Hallelujah!

 

Slow-Cooked BBQ Chicken Thighs (Food-Allergy Friendly Recipe)

Serves 6-8
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