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Tag: beans

Let’s be real for a minute. Does anyone actually stick to their new year’s resolutions? My Twitter feed is loaded with links to articles like, “10 Resolutions You’ll Actually Stick To!” Over the holiday, my sister-in-law asked me if I’ve ever had a resolution that worked and if yes, for how long. I started to ponder and I honestly don’t think I’ve had one work longer than a few months. But hey, don’t think that will stop me from setting new ones. Maybe 2102 will be the year!

Before I dive into my resolutions, I first want to pat myself on the back for a few food related things I did accomplish this year. They weren’t new year’s resolutions, but a goal none the less. I really should say “we” since all of these include my hubby too.
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This is a guest post by Traver H. Boehm. Be Food Smart showcases voices from all fronts of the food movement. Know of a blogger, farmer or passionate food writer who may be interested? Contact us or provide details in your comment.

 

This is Part 2 of a three-part series on The Paleo Diet. Click here to read Part 1.

Day 1 of our 30-day Paleo challenge is about to begin…and we have no idea what we’re in store for. What did this mean though, what were we actually allowed to and not allowed to consume? Here’s what we could eat: lean meat, fish, chicken, nuts and seeds (except cashews), vegetables (except legumes), and fruit. We could season our food with spices and that was it.
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A new grocery store is opening in Austin, Texas this year. What makes in.gredients newsworthy is the fact that they are claiming to be the first “package-free, zero waste grocery store in the United States.” So how are they doing this? The idea is so simple, it may surprise you. Everything in the store is essentially a bulk item and customers bring in their own containers to fill and purchase what they need. Forget your container? in.gredients will have compostable containers available for purchase.
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Have you ever sat down and watched a half hour of children’s programming? How many ads do you see marketed specifically towards children? Between Ronald McDonald, the Keebler Elves, Captain Crunch and Tony the Tiger, there is no shortage of cartoon mascots tantalizing our children with visions of sugary and colorful delights.

According to a newly formed inter-agency Working Group (FTC, FDA, CDC, USDA), the food industry spends more than $1.6 BILLION each year to promote junk foods to our kids (foods high in calories, low in nutrition). They find every possible way to reach your kids using TV, the internet, video games, social media, movies, and even marketing in schools. Here is a shocking statistic:

Cookies and cakes, pizza, and soda/energy/sports drinks are the top sources of calories in the diets of children 2 through 18. Chips and french fries comprise half of all the vegetables kids eat.

Since when are french fries and chips vegetables? It’s no wonder that one in three children will be overweight or obese putting them at risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma and other diseases.

Yesterday, this Working Group released a set of proposed principles for the food industry to use when marketing food to children. The proposal is designed to “encourage children, through advertising and marketing, to choose foods that make a meaningful contribution to a healthful diet; and contain limited amounts of nutrients that have a negative impact on health or weight…”

Overview of the Proposal:

The basic premise is our government is trying to get the food industry to market healthy foods to kids instead of junk food.

  • Applies to children ages 2-11 and adolescents 12-17
  • Defines what  “food marketing targeted to children” means
  • Sets separate guidelines for individual foods, main dishes and meals.
  • Gives the food industry 5 years to be in compliance with guidelines (by 2016)
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DAY TWO

I can’t believe I’ve written this much and I haven’t even covered the second day of the conference. I’m thinking I may need a professional editor to reel me in! If you’re already lost, don’t fret. This is the third installment of my experience at the Edible Institute food conference in Santa Barbara. Click here to read Part 1 and Part 2.

New Booze and Other Stuff

After a quick shower and dolly playtime with my 3-year old, I was ready for Sunday, aka, Day 2. I arrived at the hotel in time for a colorful array of sliced fruit, a mug of Tazo Earl Grey tea, and conversation with Edible Ohio’s trio-sister publishing team. The first panel represented High-Quality, Artisanal Products and Their Role in the Local Food World featuring the very young (I’m guessing mid-thirties?) Master Distiller of St-Germain, Robert Cooper.  If you’ve been following my journey, you may remember me savoring a special cocktail at lunch. Cooper and his wife were handshaking St-Germain cocktails for all the attendees and even let me keep the awesome silver monogrammed, straw/stirrer/swizzle stick (okay, I might have taken 3 because they were so chic). Pretty sweet that the owner of this exceptionally unique liquor was not too cool to stand behind the bar and get dirty. 
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Do you have an emergency dinner, something you prepare when you don’t have any other good ideas (cereal doesn’t count!)? Here is mine. We tend to have all these ingredients in the house, even when it gets close to shopping day. This meal is very popular with adults and kids. It has lots of protein and vegetables and is pretty quick to prepare. You can vary the recipe depending on what you have in the fridge (leftovers such as extra chicken or steak, steamed veggies, rice, etc.). It can be served anytime of day!

Dina’s Emergency Dinner

Egg, Bell Pepper & Black Bean Wraps

1-2 Tortillas per person (you can use either flour or corn)
1 can of Beans (black, kidney, pinto, or whatever you like)
1-2 Bell Peppers sliced into strips (red, yellow, or orange are sweetest)
1/2 or full medium-sized Onion cut into slices lengthwise (sweet onion if you have it)
1 Shallot cut into thin slices (optional)
Grated Cheese (any cheese will work, but I like medium cheddar)
1 Egg per person
Oil and/or Butter
Salt and Pepper
Optional toppings – sliced avocado or guacamole, diced tomato, leftover rice, sliced green onions, sweet corn, breakfast potatoes, cilantro
Condiments – salsa, ketchup, hot sauce, chili peppers, sour cream

Instructions:

Grate cheese and set aside. Prepare any of the toppings you are going to use and set aside. Crack eggs in a bowl, add salt and cracked pepper, whisk with fork, and set aside. Place beans in a small sauce pan and turn to lowest heat setting to simmer. If you have a toaster oven, turn on (bake setting/300/medium).  Heat oil in skillet and saute bell peppers over medium-high heat, tossing regularly to avoid browning. Once they begin to soften, add onions and continue to stir regularly. When the onions soften, add shallots.  Cook for a few more minutes until all veggies are tender, but still firm, and place into a bowl (cover with dish towel to keep warm). Add butter or more oil to the hot skillet and scramble the eggs. While eggs are cooking, place tortillas into toaster oven to warm (see below if you do not have a toaster oven). When eggs are done, place into a bowl. If you do not have a toaster oven but have a gas stove, place the tortillas over low flame to heat and soften. If you have neither, use the hot skillet to heat the tortillas individually.

Assembling the wraps:

Put plates on the counter and have all your ingredients ready. Place warmed tortilla on plate and fill with cheese, egg, bell pepper mixture and any toppings you are using. Serve immediately with an assortment of condiments on the table so people can top the wraps themselves. If you are feeling particularly tired, you can also put everything on the table and go at it taco style!