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Tag: digestive tract

The word “poop” either makes people squeamish or they just start laughing. It’s funny how something we all do virtually every day, is so tabu to talk about amongst adults (except when talking about your baby’s poop and then it is totally normal to talk about every aspect of it). In this video, Suzanne Somers interviews Brenda Watson, “poop expert” and they discuss how often you should have a bowel movement, what color it should be and even how it should smell.

It should come as no surprise that your poop can be an excellent indicator of overall health and especially of your digestive health. Watson reminds us of how our toxic food of today (antibiotics in food, GMOs), lack of essential minerals and low levels of omega-3s are killing all our beneficial gut bacteria. It is pretty tough for our bodies to function properly without the good bacteria. She also discusses the effect of food sensitivities and how many of us are walking around with inflamed digestive systems that are causing everything from digestive issues to weight gain.If you’ve ever wondered if your poop is normal or what could be causing those long, painful sessions in the restroom, watch this 6 minute video.

Related: Raw Milk Gets a Raw Deal

Dina (left) and Jonas (right); Be Food Smart booth at the Crohn's & Colitis Take Steps Walk, May 22, 2011

I arrived at the Santa Barbara Crohn’s & Colitis support group a bit early. I was surprised at the diverse nature of the group as attendees ranges from age 16 to 70ish. Like most support groups, people went around the room, introduced themselves and began sharing how they’ve been managing their disease. In between discussions of dietary restrictions and past intestinal surgeries, drug names like Humira and Remicade flew back and forth making the attendees sound more like pharmacists than regular folk. I guess that’s what happens when your life revolves around this disease.  I was fascinated and saddened by the world they lived in.
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