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Tag: FD&C Blue #2

A link between food colorings and hyperactivity highlights the importance of educational website, Be Food Smart.

Easter is the second top-selling candy holiday and according to the National Confectioners Association, almost 90% of parents will create Easter baskets for their children. Filling those baskets will be Marshmallow Peeps, Cadbury Crème Eggs, jelly beans, and M&M’s, all of which contain artificial food colorings. So what’s the concern with artificial colorings? In 2007, a University of Southampton study concluded that a diet with artificial colors increased hyperactivity in children. The European Union took action and now requires warning labels on foods containing specific dyes. To avoid the dreaded label, many European manufactures reformulated products with natural food colorings or removed dyes all together.
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Blueberries are used in hundreds of foods including cereal, bagels, pastries, breakfast bars and muffins. You see those little sweet, purplish-blue globs as you eat these foods and assume it must contain actual blueberries, right? As this video reports, the answer is probably not. More likely, you are eating a mixture of partially hydrogenated oils, starches, blue #1, blue #2, red #40, and artificial flavorings which create a fake blueberry.

As an avid ingredient reader, even I was surprised to see this blatant of a lie on food packaging of hundreds of foods. Watch this video from Mike Adams, The Health Ranger, of Natural News, to see the expose on the use of fake blueberries in foods.

To see how the food manufactures responded to this report, click for the Fox News story.

Sources:
Natural News
Fox News