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Tag: nuts

Book: Joy Bauer’s Food Cures
Authors: Joy Bauer, MS, RD, CDN with Carol Svec
Price: $21.99
Type: Nutritional Reference Guide

 

Nutritionist Joy Bauer is well known as the nutrition expert for the Today Show. She recently came out with a reference guide, Joy Bauer’s Food Cures, a book devoted to “getting you healthier, look younger and add years to your life.” We were contacted by Bauer’s team to review the book and they generously sent us a second copy to give away to one of our readers (click here for details on the giveaway).

Overview:

The book is divided into six sections: (1) Introduction to Joy Bauer and her health practice, (2) Losing Weight, (3) Looking Great which includes chapters on skin, hair and teeth, (4) Living Long & Strong – cardiovascular disease, arthritis, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, vision, and memory, (5) Feeling Good – mood, migraine headaches, PMS, insomnia, irritable bowl syndrome, celiac disease, and cancer prevention, (6) Resources – reading labels, references. You can almost look at this guide as many little books in one, as each chapter stands on its own with basics, tips, food & shopping lists, FAQs, and recipes.
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While scrolling through my wall today, I stumbled upon this infographic from visualeconomics that Dr. La Puma posted on his Facebook page. I love checking out food related infographics and found this particular one interesting. Let’s see, we eat more fats & oils than chicken, more sugar & corn sweeteners than red meat, and crazy amounts of dairy (631 lbs per year if you combine cheese & dairy). The total amount of fruits and vegetables (688 lbs) looks decent, although I wish I could see a stat on what percentage of that number is fresh vs. heavily processed (aka. Campbell’s canned vegetable soup and the 29 lbs of potatoes in our french fries). I’m not entirely sure what “beverage milks” means. Does it include chocolate milk or is it just non-dairy “milks” such as almond, hemp, soy, etc., or all of the above?

What really caught by eye, though, was the section down below that shows the average American consumes 24 POUNDS of artificial sweeteners per year. 24 pounds? That’s about what my daughter weighed when she was 2 years old (and coincidentally, the size of the average giraffe heart…fun fact). If you think you’re not consuming artificial sweeteners, think again. They are hiding everywhere. It’s the saccharin in your iced tea, the aspartame in your diet soda, and the sucralose in that ice cream bar. Even your chewing gum has been infiltrated as it’s virtually impossible to walk into a grocery store and buy a pack without artificial sweeteners. These innocuous powders also lurk in diet foods, products marketed to diabetics, and all sorts of no-sugar treats. Even Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf uses artificial sweeteners in their “no sugar” beverages (I honestly thought that they were made without any sweetener until I actually asked). If you want to reduce your intake, start by reading labels. Once you spot these guys, make the commitment to try a new brand that doesn’t contain artificial sweeteners, make it yourself, or better yet, give it up altogether. Can’t quit yet? Yes, you over there drinking your Diet Coke. Start by reducing your intake until you can break the habit altogether.

Check out the infographic down below for details and tell us what you find significant.

 

Source: Visual Economics

This is a guest post by Traver H. Boehm. Be Food Smart showcases voices from all fronts of the food movement. Know of a blogger, farmer or passionate food writer who may be interested? Contact us or provide details in your comment.

 

This is Part 2 of a three-part series on The Paleo Diet. Click here to read Part 1.

Day 1 of our 30-day Paleo challenge is about to begin…and we have no idea what we’re in store for. What did this mean though, what were we actually allowed to and not allowed to consume? Here’s what we could eat: lean meat, fish, chicken, nuts and seeds (except cashews), vegetables (except legumes), and fruit. We could season our food with spices and that was it.
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The “Potato Chip Study,” published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, found interesting links between certain foods and weight gain. Researches from Harvard University looked at the long-term effects of diet, exercise and other lifestyle changes in a study that included over 120,000 men and women.

4-year weight change was most strongly associated with these foods (average weight gain/loss is shown in parentheses):
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Have you ever sat down and watched a half hour of children’s programming? How many ads do you see marketed specifically towards children? Between Ronald McDonald, the Keebler Elves, Captain Crunch and Tony the Tiger, there is no shortage of cartoon mascots tantalizing our children with visions of sugary and colorful delights.

According to a newly formed inter-agency Working Group (FTC, FDA, CDC, USDA), the food industry spends more than $1.6 BILLION each year to promote junk foods to our kids (foods high in calories, low in nutrition). They find every possible way to reach your kids using TV, the internet, video games, social media, movies, and even marketing in schools. Here is a shocking statistic:

Cookies and cakes, pizza, and soda/energy/sports drinks are the top sources of calories in the diets of children 2 through 18. Chips and french fries comprise half of all the vegetables kids eat.

Since when are french fries and chips vegetables? It’s no wonder that one in three children will be overweight or obese putting them at risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma and other diseases.

Yesterday, this Working Group released a set of proposed principles for the food industry to use when marketing food to children. The proposal is designed to “encourage children, through advertising and marketing, to choose foods that make a meaningful contribution to a healthful diet; and contain limited amounts of nutrients that have a negative impact on health or weight…”

Overview of the Proposal:

The basic premise is our government is trying to get the food industry to market healthy foods to kids instead of junk food.

  • Applies to children ages 2-11 and adolescents 12-17
  • Defines what  “food marketing targeted to children” means
  • Sets separate guidelines for individual foods, main dishes and meals.
  • Gives the food industry 5 years to be in compliance with guidelines (by 2016)
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FDA Recall information is now available on the Be Food Smart blog. Recall information is received from the FDA as soon as they issue a press release. Take a look at the recent recalls on the bottom right of the blog (in the yellow bar under the tags section). Check back often as mandatory and voluntary food recalls are, unfortunately, very common.

Food recalls may occur for a variety of reasons including:

  • Undelcared ingredients – especially those which are common allergens such as sulfites, nuts, soy, dairy, etc.
  • Health risks such as salmonella, listeria or E. coli
  • The presence of certain chemicals which may cause adverse affects
  • Problems with packaging, expiration dates, or manufacturing standards

As you can see from the first bullet, you really don’t know what’s in your food if it comes in a package. There very well may be nuts in a product that you specifically purchased because it was nut-free. If you or someone in your family has a food allergy or is very sensitive to certain foods, check the recall list often and try to reduce the amount of packaged foods you purchase.