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Tag: potatoes

Headline Roundup 7.6.11

Here are a few recent headlines that caught my eye:

The True Cost of Bananas

Did you know that bananas are the most frequently purchased item at the grocery store and that major chains will not increase the price above $0.99/lb? I couldn’t believe it until I was at my local Lassen’s health food store and saw that even their organic, fair trade bananas were, you guessed it, $0.99/lb. This article is a fascinating look at the ugly underbelly of the banana industry. I kind of always knew bananas had a secret life, but did not know of the inner workings of the industry. Author Phyllis Robinson speaks from a place of passion and true knowledge (she spent her travels exploring the banana trade in South America). For anyone who “requires” a banana in their morning smoothie like I do, this long, but important article is a must read. Read the full story on Small Farmers Big Change
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The “Potato Chip Study,” published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, found interesting links between certain foods and weight gain. Researches from Harvard University looked at the long-term effects of diet, exercise and other lifestyle changes in a study that included over 120,000 men and women.

4-year weight change was most strongly associated with these foods (average weight gain/loss is shown in parentheses):
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Gerri French recently joined Be Food Smart as a Special Advisor. She comes to us with over 30 years of experience as Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator (see Gerri’s full bio here). I sat down with Gerri last week to ask her a few questions. Here are some highlights from our chat.

Are there any popular/major diets that you like? For example, Paleo, South Beach, Zone, blood type, Mediterranean, Weight Watchers, etc.  Are there any you would recommend?

No one diet works for everyone. As a dietitian I listen to my patients to learn their needs and concerns while assessing their lifestyle, laboratory data and medical history; a very personalized approach.  A general diet book does not take the individual person into consideration.  There are many healthy people out there eating a variety of diets. Mediterranean and Asian people who follow diets taught by their ancestors tend to be healthiest and the research supports it. I am happy to see people returning to enjoying earthy seasonal local foods, heirloom grains and beans and also fermented foods.
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