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Tag: probiotics

The word “poop” either makes people squeamish or they just start laughing. It’s funny how something we all do virtually every day, is so tabu to talk about amongst adults (except when talking about your baby’s poop and then it is totally normal to talk about every aspect of it). In this video, Suzanne Somers interviews Brenda Watson, “poop expert” and they discuss how often you should have a bowel movement, what color it should be and even how it should smell.

It should come as no surprise that your poop can be an excellent indicator of overall health and especially of your digestive health. Watson reminds us of how our toxic food of today (antibiotics in food, GMOs), lack of essential minerals and low levels of omega-3s are killing all our beneficial gut bacteria. It is pretty tough for our bodies to function properly without the good bacteria. She also discusses the effect of food sensitivities and how many of us are walking around with inflamed digestive systems that are causing everything from digestive issues to weight gain.If you’ve ever wondered if your poop is normal or what could be causing those long, painful sessions in the restroom, watch this 6 minute video.

Related: Raw Milk Gets a Raw Deal

This week we’re doing a deep dive on the very popular, Greek-style yogurt. The first post, Greek-style yogurt 101,  was dedicated to explaining what Greek-style yogurt is, why it’s different than regular yogurt, and how to make it at home. The second post was all about what to look for at the grocery store including fat (we’re pro-fat around here), flavors, and additives. Today, is all about the brands. We took 9 popular brands and compared everything from price to additives. The one thing missing? Taste! We want to see what our readers think:

 

 

The Results

The brands below are listed in order from best to worst. We looked at the following information to rank the yogurt:

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breakfast © by janineomg

 

I’d been seeing “Greek-style” yogurt for quite some time before I actually tried it. My first thought was why the heck did I wait so long? This stuff is tasty. It’s thick, uber creamy, tart, and satisfying. Apparently, I’m not the only one licking my spoon. 5 years ago Greek-style yogurt was a $60 million business in the US. Fast forward to 2011 and sales are predicted to be $1.5 billion. Everyone wants a piece of the action and yogurt giants, Dannon and Yoplait,  are scrambling as tiny player, Chobani, sky rockets to #1 with 10% market share in all yogurt.

Yogurt is often called a “superfood” and for good reason. It’s high in protein and the live cultures (probiotics) and helpful bacteria help maintain the healthy flora in our gut. A recent long-term study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that yogurt was inversely associated with weight gain. The more yogurt the participants ate, the less they gained weight. The popularity of yogurt shows no signs of slowing down as just last year, The Dairy Council of California named yogurt as the food trend of the decade. If you haven’t tried Greek-style yet, you’re missing out. Here is a helpful Q&A on this special variation of yogurt:
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This is Part 2 of a three-part series on raw milk.

Mark McAfee, Organic Pastures CEO

Last week I attended a meeting given by the Santa Barbara chapter of the Weston A. Price Foundation (WAPF) on raw milk. The guest speaker was Mark McAfee, CEO of Organic Pastures. If you are following this series on raw milk, you’ve already learned a bit about the differences between factory farmed milk and raw milk produced for direct consumption (click here for Part 1). This is Part 2 of the series.

Bacteriosapiens

We we are all bacteriosapiens. 80% of the human immune system is made from protective gut bacteria colonies. Once you discover what you are microbiologically, killing bacteria become “suicidal.”

- text from one of Mark McAfee’s slides

When Mark wanted his audience to understand the importance of good bacteria in the body, did he just tell us? No, instead he gave us the gift of fecal transplants. Curious? Ya, I was too. Mark used a story from the New York Times about a woman who suffered from a vicious gut infection, Clostridium difficile. Doctors tried an assortment of antibiotics, but nothing worked. She lost 60 pounds, wore diapers for her constant diarrhea, was wheelchair bound, and on her way to certain death. Dr. Alexander Khoruts tested the bacteria in her intestines and found that there was no healthy bacteria present. He decided to do something drastic and performed a little-known procedure called fecal transplantation. Yes, it’s what you think. He took the poop from her husband, mixed it with some saline, and put it in her colon. Within hours, her husband’s bacteria began doing its magic and her diarrhea vanished. Within 2 weeks it cured her disease! I find this article utterly fascinating as it so interestingly highlights the incredible importance of healthy intestinal flora. Touche Mark. Touche.
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