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Tag: produce

I keep seeing articles claiming that many organics are a waste of money. Even health guru Dr. Mercola (whom I tend to agree with on most issues) wrote an article on it. The advice is to buy conventional (non-organic) for the EWG’s Clean 15 list or for fruits & veggies with thick skins/those you peel to save money. What this advice says is that the rate of pesticides found on produce should be the ONLY determining factor when deciding between organic and non-organic. While pesticide levels are extremely important, it is concerning that people may automatically choose conventional for the “cleaner” foods. The writers, many of whom are nutritionists, are failing to point out the OTHER reasons why organic makes sense.

Contemplating between organic and conventional?  Here are 6 OTHER reasons why organics make sense:

ONE:  More Vitamins & Minerals – There is evidence suggesting that conventionally grown produce may be less healthy than it once was due to the “dilution effect.” Why? Produce is grown with fertilizer for desirable traits (firmness, color, increased size, etc.) instead of optimal vitamin & mineral content. Essentially, produce is larger with more “dry matter,” but doesn’t proportionately contain as many nutrients. You have to eat more to get the same amount of nutrients.
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We knocked on her door not sure what to expect. It was Saturday in July and my hubby and I were sans toddler. For the next 4 hours we were in the hands of Cindy Shipp and we were there  to can. You know it’s going to be a good experience when you sit down to no less than 10 delectable, artisan “dippers” with appropriate accouterments. Cindy, of SB Canning, is an incredibly gracious host and is passionate about sharing both her knowledge of canning and her loot of homemade goodness (we got to try her Cabernet Wine Jelly and Strawberry Margarita Jam. To die for! Ya, ya…I see the booze connection too).
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A new grocery store is opening in Austin, Texas this year. What makes in.gredients newsworthy is the fact that they are claiming to be the first “package-free, zero waste grocery store in the United States.” So how are they doing this? The idea is so simple, it may surprise you. Everything in the store is essentially a bulk item and customers bring in their own containers to fill and purchase what they need. Forget your container? in.gredients will have compostable containers available for purchase.
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Depending on what survey you look at, anywhere from 70-96% of Americans want labeling of genetically engineered (GE) foods. In the absence of such labeling, how do you know if something has GE ingredients? Chances are if it contains soy, canola oil, corn or sugar beets, it has an extremely high likelihood of being GE. What about fresh produce? The only way to know for sure is to buy certified organic produce.
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About 5 years ago, my hubby and I got serious about religiously shopping with our canvas bags. We’d get home, unpack the groceries and still be left with 5-7 plastic bags. Why you ask? Two words: fresh produce.

Virtually everywhere you can shop, be it the grocery store, mega-store, CSA, or farmer’s market, provides plastic produce bags or houses their fresh fare in plastic containers, plastic baskets, or plastic mesh. The plastic bags serve several purposes: (1) provides a vestibule for you to place your lettuce in (2) prevents oranges from rolling around your shopping cart or basket (3) allows the cashier to visually identify your apples and differentiate between the Pink Lady and the Gala (4) contains your peppers in a “weightless” material so they are easily and accurately weighed or counted.

A standard trip to our farmer’s market reveals an interesting irony. Almost everyone carries reusable shopping bags, handmade African baskets, or is pushing some sort of cart, but they all contain a mass of plastic bags with their individual purchases. That kind of defeats the purpose, doesn’t it?
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We are all looking for ways to save money. Food costs keep climbing while paychecks seem to stay constant or be non-existent for many American families in this tough economy. There are ways to save money while still managing to eat healthy. Here are a few simple tips.

Plan Weekly Meals
Every Saturday morning, my husband and I sit down and plan out our meals for the week. We look at the calendar to see what we have scheduled and select meals accordingly. If it is a busy week, we stick to quick and easy to prepare meals. Have kids? Involve them in the meal planning process and get their suggestions too. It sounds simple, but one of the keys to success with this tip is writing the meals down in a visible place (we have a whiteboard on the fridge). This way everyone in the family knows what to expect each day and cooking can start immediately instead of playing the “what’s for dinner tonight?” game again. If you stay committed to the weekly plan, you’ll also find you go out to eat much less often.
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