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Tag: sustainable

I attended the SOL Food Festival last year with my hubby and daughter. One of the big draws was Iron Chef, Cat Cora, doing a food demo on the main stage. When we arrived at the park across from the Saturday Santa Barbara Farmers Market we were greeted by a full-feathered, free-roaming turkey (looking suspiciously like the pied piper with his entourage of about 20 kids following his every move). To the right was the ostrich pen which housed 4 baby ostriches. Not a site to be missed. Behind them, the coolest geometrically shaped chicken coop I’ve ever seen.

Born from the minds of two incredible women, Alison Hensley and Heather Hartley, the festival pays homage to real food – that which is Sustainable, Organic and Local (hence then name SOL) and this year is the second annual event. One of our missions at Be Food Smart is to educate people about food. This is also the mission of the SOL Food Festival which is why I’ve been attending their planning meetings for the past few months. If you are in driving distance of Santa Barbara, support this great cause and join us.

SOL Food Festival

Saturday, October 1, 2011
10am -6pm
Plaza de Vera Cruz Park & Cota Street (between Anacapa & Santa Barbara Streets)

Why YOU should attend:

Mamas & Papas
Bring the kiddos so they can check out the farm equipment, see animals galore, practice their cooking skills and dance to the music. The best part? No need to fight over buying junk food and cotton candy at the food court.

Single Gals & Gents

Beer & Wine Garden, hunky farmers and hottie hippie chicks. Need I say more?

Foodies
Farmers, food demos and a chance to socialize with the who’s who of Santa Barbara’s sustainable food world.

Average Joes & Janes
This is your chance to get involved and change the way you eat. Find out what amazing local resources are available in your backyard. Between the 3 stages, countless demos, fabulous exhibitors and great tasting, good-for-you food, you’re bound to go home with new skills and knowledge you can actually use.

The Joel Salatin Wannabes
Pick up tips on composting, building a chicken coop, biodynamic gardening, and soil management. It’s time to get some dirt under those nails!

Save the date!


Over the weekend, I took my daughter to the Ty Warner Sea Center. Between petting the sharks and holding the hermit crabs, we passed by their exhibit on consuming sustainable fish. As a part of the exhibit, they made available these handy little wallet guides to help make seafood choices when shopping or dining easier. The Monterey Bay Aquarium created the guides and they update them each year. They also have a Sushi Guide which I grabbed too.

Most health professionals will tell you that consuming fish is healthy. What you’ll learn through these guides and other resources  is, that unfortunately, many varieties are overfished or are caught/farmed in ways that harm other marine life or the environment. In addition, health concerns surrounding mercury and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) exposure are very legitimate. Below is a list of resources to help you make the best seafood choices. Want the cliff notes? Skip to the bottom and see the Super Green List of seafood.

Seafood Watch

The Monterey Bay Aquarium has a whole section of their website devoted to helping people find the best seafood options.

Mobile Apps

  • Seafood Watch has helpful smart phone apps for both the iPhone and Android. Best of all? They are free and very easy to use. A quick search on my iPhone does show other seafood apps, but most are not free.

Environmental Defense Fund (EDF)

The EDF supplied the containment information for the Seafood Watch guides. Their site features:

  • A great chart which shows the maximum servings that can be safely eaten each month of a long list of fish (with regards to mecury & PCBs)
  • A complete list of seafood with “Eco-Ratings”
  • A Fish Oil Supplement guide

EatingWell

Eating Well has put together their own Seafood Guide. It is a long list of fish and for each type, shows:

  • Health concerns – mercury, PCBs
  • If it is a good source of Omega-3s
  • Harvest notes – impact on environment/overfishing/farming

The Super Green List

The Monterey Bay Aquarium has identified seafood that is “Super Green,” meaning that it is good for human health and does not harm the oceans. This list highlights options that are currently on the Seafood Watch “Best Choices” list, are low in environmental contaminants (below 216 parts per billion [ppb] mercury and 11 ppb PCBs) and are good sources of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (at least the daily minimum of 250 milligrams). This list is considered the “best of the best” and was last updated September 2010.

  • Albacore Tuna (troll- or pole-caught, from the U.S. or British Columbia)
  • Freshwater Coho Salmon (farmed in tank systems, from the U.S.)
  • Oysters (farmed)
  • Pacific Sardines (wild-caught)
  • Rainbow Trout (farmed)
  • Salmon (wild-caught, from Alaska)

Image: Ramon Grosso