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On September 27th, The New York Times ran this picture along with an article on the quest for perfectly cooked chicken.


The picture featured a plucked and “naked” chicken propped up in a sort of centerfold “pose.” Tiina Loite, photo editor, came up with the concept:
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I stumbled across Caren Alpert’s website after Michael Pollan tweeted about her amazing photography, terra cibus. To be honest, I never really thought about what food looks like really, REALLY close up. Curious? Here is how Alpert explains her work:

What’s in our food?

What’s the difference between a bird’s-eye view of a remote vegetable crop and a microscopic swath from a pineapple leaf? How distinct is a pile of table salt from miles and miles of icebergs?

As a food lover and a photographer I answer these questions visually. Using scientific laboratory photo equipment, I journey over the surfaces of both organic and processed foods: my own favorites and America’s over-indulgences. The closer the lens got, the more I saw food and consumers of food (all of us!) as part of a larger eco-system than mere sustenance.

- Caren Alpert’s Artist Statement

Alpert took everyday foods, such as table salt, Oreos, and cauliflower, magnified them anywhere from 15 to 850 times and then photographed them. The result? Breathtaking art.

My personal favorite is the shrimp table. What’s yours?

Image: windy via Flickr

When an experience inspires you to see that dream again, motivates you to a place you haven’t felt in a long time, and adds a monstrous log to the fire in your soul, what do you call it? Heaven? For me, it was the 2011 Edible Institute. For 20 hours, over two days, I listened, absorbed, brainstormed, smiled, scribbled, tweeted (#EI2011), consumed, and connected.

If you are not familiar with Edible, they are beautiful magazines filled with everything food-related local to that area, or as they say,  Award Winning Magazines That Celebrate Local Foods, Season by Season. When you so much as glance at an Edible magazine, you know that  it is something unique. The first thing you’ll see is the stunning cover. When you pick it up, the luxuriously thick pages beckon to be flipped and the sumptuous photographs visually devoured. There are almost 70 Edible magazines and publishers flew in from all over the United States and Canada this past Wednesday to attend a publishers’ conference. Starting at 7:30am Saturday, the Edible Institute ignited bringing publishers together with food writers, farmers, activists, artisans, cookbook authors, winemakers, bloggers, and little old me.
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